New work

I have decided to indulge my fascination with texture.  I use whatever feels right at the time, pieces of paper, material and whatever else catches my imagination.  I  have been having such fun and look forward to where ever my new journey in this style takes me.

My new works are full of texture, depth and colour and my new pieces are all abstract in nature.

A lot of these pieces have been painted on recycled timber.   I love to recycle wherever I can and I use pieces of found driftwood and old pieces of furniture. I also use pages from old books, pieces of material, broken zippers and whatever odd pieces I discover.

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Pete the Pelican – loves a good read.

I love a good readGreat news my Pete the Pelican has been featured on the Australian Wandarrah Team Page “Shop Australia NZ” at
www.etsy.com/au/pages/shopaustralia
It is featured in the Australia Day board.www.etsy.com/au/pages/shopaustralia/australia-day?ref=pg_index_23.

Please take the time to click on the above link and have a browse.  There are heaps of fabulous works from Australian Artists.

My Peter the Pelican is one of my seven characters that feature in my Australian Animal Readers Bookmark range.

Dangers of Swimming at Night

I live by the ocean and the inspiration for this poem and painting was an article in the local paper about a tourist to the Gold Coast who went swimming late one night after a celebratory night-out in Surfers Paradise.

It is important to always respect the ocean both during the day and at night.

The Dangers of swimming at night

Dangers of swimming at night.

An ocean is a world of its own

A mystery, an unknown zone

Wonder at its undiscovered depths

Respect and love its strength.

The ocean gives , the ocean takes

Upon shores its endless waves break

We sail upon, we fish, we play

Sun shines on blue throughout  the day.

At night, we swim for fun

No fear,  let  inhibitions run

Who cares what lurks beneath,

Way down, down in the deep.

However danger goes before.

Check who’s watching the shore

Swim in close don’t go too far

Good morning sunshine.

good morning sunshine b

Good morning sunshine

Your radiant rays welcome the day

Orange hues chase night skies away

Your warmth revives life anew

Caress the sky into hues of blue.

Good morning sunshine.

Flowers and buds seek out your light

Morning birds celebrate with songs so bright

Each morning let us praise with voice

Contemplate and reverently rejoice

Giver of life – good morning sunshine.

 

The photograph of this beautiful sunrise was taken this week on my early morning walk.  The photo has been digitally altered to make it an interesting image.

Last 2 Methods in the series 24 Ways to make Art

writingWriting:  the art of telling stories only with words

Writing is a medium of human communication that represents language through the inscription or recording of signs and symbols. In most languages, writing is a complement to speech or spoken language. Writing is not a language but a form of technology. Within a language system, writing relies on many of the same structures as speech, such as vocabulary, grammar and semantics, with the added dependency of a system of signs or symbols, usually in the form of a formal alphabet. The result of writing is generally called text, and the recipient of text is called a reader. Motivations for writing include publication, storytelling, correspondence and diary. Writing has been instrumental in keeping history, dissemination of knowledge through the media and the formation of legal systems.

As human societies emerged, the development of writing was driven by pragmatic exigencies such as exchanging information, maintaining financial accounts, codifying laws and recording history. Around the 4th millennium BCE, the complexity of trade and administration in Mesopotamia outgrew human memory, and writing became a more dependable method of recording and presenting transactions in a permanent form. In both Ancient Egypt and Mesoamerica writing may have evolved through calendrics and a political necessity for recording historical and environmental events.

jewelleryGold-smithery, silver-smithery, and jewellery, the art of creating jewels:

Jewellery or jewelry consists of small decorative items worn for personal adornment, such as brooches, rings, necklaces, earrings, and bracelets. Jewellery may be attached to the body or the clothes, and the term is restricted to durable ornaments, excluding flowers for example. For many centuries metal, often combined with gemstones, has been the normal material for jewellery, but other materials such as shells and other plant materials may be used. It is one of the oldest type of archaeological artefact – with 100,000-year-old beads made from Nassarius shells thought to be the oldest known jewellery. The basic forms of jewellery vary between cultures but are often extremely long-lived; in European cultures the most common forms of jewellery listed above have persisted since ancient times, while other forms such as adornments for the nose or ankle, important in other cultures, are much less common. Historically, the most widespread influence on jewellery in terms of design and style have come from Asia.

Jewellery may be made from a wide range of materials. Gemstones and similar materials such as amber and coral, precious metals, beads, and shells have been widely used, and enamel has often been important. In most cultures jewellery can be understood as a status symbol, for its material properties, its patterns, or for meaningful symbols. Jewellery has been made to adorn nearly every body part, from hairpins to toe rings, and even genital jewellery. The patterns of wearing jewellery between the sexes, and by children and older people can vary greatly between cultures, but adult women have been the most consistent wearers of jewellery; in modern European culture the amount worn by adult males is relatively low compared with other cultures and other periods in European culture.

The word jewellery itself is derived from the word jewel, which was anglicized from the Old French “jouel”, and beyond that, to the Latin word “jocale”, meaning plaything. In British English, New Zealand English, Hiberno-English, Australian English, and South African English it is spelled jewellery, while the spelling is jewelry in American English. Both are used in Canadian English.

In formation sourced from Wikipedia.

A challenge to write a Poem about Love

This challenge was put out by a fellow blogger, Marlyn Exconde.  So I thought I would give it a try.

The poem had to be no more than 10 lines.  Each line had to contain only 4 words and each line heart_of_love_201813had to have the word ‘love’ in it.

Can you rise to the challenge?  Please try yourself and send in your poem.

Anyway – here is mine.

Love, how many ways.

 Love of beauty fair

 Children’s love- beyond compare

Love a wondrous emotion

Animal love unending devotion

Love thy Neighbours –  feat

Food, love to eat!

Love of money – weakness.

Love fellow man- greatness.

Love is human kindness.

 

No 17th and 18th of 24 Ways to create Art

poetryPoetry is a form of literature that uses aesthetic and rhythmic qualities of language—such as phonaesthetics, sound symbolism, and metre—to evoke meanings in addition to, or in place of, the prosaic ostensible meaning.

Poetry has a long history, dating back to the Sumerian Epic of Gilgamesh. Early poems evolved from folk songs such as the Chinese Shijing, or from a need to retell oral epics, as with the Sanskrit Vedas, Zoroastrian Gathas, and the Homeric epics, the Iliad and the Odyssey.  Ancient attempts to define poetry, such as Aristotle’s Poetics, focused on the uses of speech in rhetoric, drama, song and comedy. Later attempts concentrated on features such as repetition, verse form and rhyme, and emphasized the aesthetics which distinguish poetry from more objectively informative, prosaic forms of writing. From the mid-20th century, poetry has sometimes been more generally regarded as a fundamental creative act employing language.

Poetry uses forms and conventions to suggest differential interpretation to words, or to evoke emotive responses.. Similarly figures of speech such as metaphor, simile and metonymy create a resonance between otherwise disparate images—a layering of meanings, forming connections previously not perceived. Kindred forms of resonance may exist, between individual verses, in their patterns of rhyme or rhythm.

Some poetry types are specific to particular cultures and genres and respond to characteristics of the language in which the poet writes.

Made by Samsung DVCPottery, the art of transforming clay and mud into beautiful recipients. Pottery is the ceramic material which makes up pottery wares, of which major types include earthenware, stoneware and porcelain.

Pottery is made by forming a clay body into objects of a required shape and heating them to high temperatures in a kiln which removes all the water from the clay, which induces reactions that lead to permanent changes including increasing their strength and hardening and setting their shape. A clay body can be decorated before or after firing. Prior to some shaping processes, clay must be prepared. Kneading helps to ensure an even moisture content throughout the body. Air trapped within the clay body needs to be removed. This is called de-airing and can be accomplished by a machine called a vacuum pug or manually by wedging. Wedging can also help produce an even moisture content. Once a clay body has been kneaded and de-aired or wedged, it is shaped by a variety of techniques. After shaping it is dried and then fired.

In formation sourced from Wikipedia.