Up in the Treetops

I have been working on a very large canvas to go on the living room wall in our home. Our living room opens to the front balcony which is up among the treetops of a beautiful leopard tree and lovely poinsettia tree.  It is such a lovely retreat to sit on the deck and be surrounded by waiving leafy branches away from the rest of the world.

So when I was trying to decide on a suitable subject matter for this large painting, it took quite a while.  Did I want to do a colourful abstract? I wasn’t sure and as I don’t paint in a traditional style, a landscape was out.  One day whilst reading out on the deck, it finally dawned on me, paint my treetops!

I took some photos looking upwards into my treetops and then played around with them in Photoshop until I settled on a suitable composition.

First sketch the tree trunk and branches.

treetops Working on up in the Treetopstreetops Finished the Tree Trunks

Then I had to paint in the tree canopy and all of the leaves.  This took quite a while until I was happy with the composition.

Up in the Tree Tops

It was quite a task to hang this large painting as it had to be hung in a very high position above our staircase.   This involved ladders, tressels and the help of a builder;  however it is finally up and looks great.  What do you think?

in the treetops

 

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Experimenting with Digital Art

We are currently travelling overseas and the weather of the last few days has resulted in our being inside, rather than out exploring the country.

It has always been my intent to try my hand at digital art.  Therefore I have spent this spare time investigating and playing with my old PhotoShop digital art program that I have on my laptop.

I have had this program for over 10 years but to date have only used it to improve my photographs.

I obviously have a long way to go before I get any good at this method,  it is fun but much more complicated than I thought.  As I have only a mouse to use at the moment, I envision it will be mush easier once I get an up to date program plus proper equipment such as drawing tablet, pen etc.

Digital art is indeed an interesting medium and one which will sit along nicely with all the other mediums of art that I currently play with.

Anyhow here are two of my first efforts.  I went with birds as they seemed the easiest without a tablet and pen.  Having only a mouse makes it difficult.

Please let me know what do you think.

Sweet HoneyeaterAre you looking at me

My largest Painting ever!

I have just completed my largest painting ever!  A large Abstract Triptych.Abstract Tryptich on wall

I was commissioned to paint this piece for a very large wall in my client’s living room.

The brief was that it had to be bright and colourful and large!

The final piece  (made up of  three canvases)  measures 1600 mm deep  by 350o mm wide when  hung.

After collaboration with the client, it was eventually decided to use bright oranges, lemon, purples and greens to cascade across the canvases.Abstract Tryptich close up on wall

There is a suggestion of creeks and  fallen leaves and in the background rain forest trees through a mist.

Abstract  tree roots and drooping fronds of palm berries finish off the piece.

This commission was enjoyable to complete and the client loves the work so everyone is happy!Abstract Tryptich

Blackie the Black Parrot is Featured on the Shop Australia page on Etsy.

King ParrottThere are some fabulous examples of Australian art on this months Shop  Australia’s Board on Etsy.

Please visit and enjoy all the great work currently being displayed from my  fellow Australian artists.

I am delighted to say that my Blackie, the Black Parrot is featured in the Australia Day Board.

Just click on the ling below.

www.etsy.com/au/pages/shopaustralia/australia-day?ref=pg_index_23.

Three new residents at the Fudge Shop

Today I took three of my little driftwood pieces to stay at the Fudge Shop up on Springbrook Mountain.

Hopefully they will soon find a new home.

azure kingfisherAzure Kingfisher

Scientific name: Ceyx azureus

Alcedinidae

With its combination of royal-blue plumage on its upperparts contrasting with orange on its underparts, the Azure Kingfisher is one of the smallest and most dazzling kingfishers in Australia. This diminutive species inhabits the vegetation beside waterways and other wetlands, where it often perches on low, overhanging branches, searching for its prey of fish, crustaceans and aquatic insects, captured by shallow plunging into the water. Anglers on lonely rivers are sometimes surprised to find an Azure Kingfisher perched quietly on their fishing rods instead of a branch.

 

 

 

ringtail possum 1Eastern Pygmy-possum

Scientific name: Cercartetus nanus

Conservation status in NSW: Vulnerable

Eastern Pygmy-possums are tiny (15 to 43 grams) active climbers, with almost bare, prehensile (capable of curling and gripping) tails, and big, forward-pointing ears.

The Eastern Pygmy-possum is found in south-eastern Australia, from southern Queensland to eastern South Australia and in Tasmania. In NSW it extents from the coast inland as far as the Pilliga, Dubbo, Parkes and Wagga Wagga on the western slopes.

Feeds largely on nectar and pollen collected from banksias, eucalypts and bottlebrushes; an important pollinator of heathland plants such as banksias; soft fruits are eaten when flowers are unavailable.

 

treefrog 2aRed-eye Tree Frog

Scientific name: Litoria chloris,

Also commonly known as the red-eyed tree frog or orange-eyed tree frog, is a species of tree frog native to eastern Australia; ranging from north of Sydney to Proserpine in mid-northern Queensland.

This species of frog is associated with rainforests, wet sclerophyll forests, and woodlands. The call is several long, moaning “aaa-rk” sounds, followed by soft trills. Males call and breeding takes place mostly after rain in temporary ponds, roadside ditches, dams, ponds, and creek offshoots where the water is not flowing.

My very own Didgeridoo!

pandanus treeDonna's drift wood finished - Copy

 

 

My friends all know that I like to resurrect pieces of driftwood and natural pebbles

So friends often turn up at my studio with a piece of unusual driftwood or pebbles that they have found whilst they were out and about.

A while ago a special artist friend turned up with a long and interesting piece of pandanus tree that she had found washed up on Burleigh Headland.

It was bruised and battered and looked like it had been floating in the ocean for a long time, full of holes, but what an interesting and unusual shape and patina on the timber!

It was beautiful but the shape was so usual that I could not decide what I was going to do with it.

I placed it in a prominent position in the garden, near the pool, where I could look at it daily.  It took me over 4 months but I finally felt the piece ‘speak’ to me.

The Pandanus spiralis is an Australian shrub or small tree up to 10 metres in height. It has long, spiny leaves organised in a spiral arrangement. The plant bears a large, pineapple-like cluster of fruit that turn orange-red when ripe.  Wildlife including birds take advantage of the spiny leaves by living in the tree for protection. They also favour its fruit.

So I decided to continue with the Australian theme and I covered it with shapes and stripes in Australia’s earth colours of orange, yellow and yellow ochre.

When I had finished I found that I ended up with my very own didgeridoo.

Donna's drift wood finished a

 

driftwood close up