Viridian Nude

Viridian Nude

Acrylic on canvas

915mm x 610mm

Created: 2019

Painted in tones of viridian green with touches of blue and purple.

My nude sits on the rocks watching the waves below.

Her shoulder and left side have kisses of a warm copper paint to represent the sun caressing and warming her skin.

As I normally paint in many layers, this canvas has many, many layers of paint to build up the texture of the figure, waves and rocks.

I want to encourage the viewer to gently run their hand over the canvas to feel all the bumps and ridges.

Will she jump in to enjoy the cool water or will she just sit and watch?

Surfing at Laceys

PENTAX Image

Surfing at Laceys

Painted on Board

40 x 40cm x 2cm

I walk the beach at Lacey’s next door to the mouth of Currumbin Creek each day and I love to watch the surfers catching their waves.  Alongside Currumbin Creek, Lacey’s is a popular spot for serious surfers.

Painted in oil with cold wax medium on a cradled board. This is another piece in my Smaller Art Collection. I create these small pieces for those homeowners who do not have wall space for large pieces of art.  I believe everyone should live with art, I hope these small pieces enable them to live with art in their home.

Black Crows

Black Crows

Acrylic on Stretched Canvas

610mm x 760mm

‘Black Crows’ is an intriguing image painted in a modern style. Yellow, black and purple. 

Painted in a contemporary manner, I was inspired to paint this piece after hearing the crows that are always calling each other in our neighborhood,

It is a little menacing, but intriguing.  I have used many layers of black yellows and ochres with hints of purple to represent the depths of the trees in the bush they reside in.  The crows rule the bush and protect their territory against intruders.

Homage to Picasso

Homage to Picasso

Painted on Driftwood

23 x 40cm x 5cm

This piece in painted on driftwood found on my local beach. It is in homage to Picasso who is one of my inspirations.   

She is in the style of Picasso’s Dora Maar paintings. By some accounts, Dora Maar’s relationship with Pablo Picasso marked the end of her artistic career. When the young photographer took up with the older, celebrated artist in 1936, she was a rising star in Surrealist circles.

She is painted in acrylic paint and has a hook on the back to mount on the wall.

She is full of color and life.

Spring Flowers Blue

Spring Flowers Blue

Acrylic on Stretched Canvas

610mm x 760mm

Painted for spring.  Flowers make you happy and their beauty always demands your attention. I painted this vase of colorful flowers to brighten up the home.

Painted in the impressionist style, the quick thick paint strokes give a liveness to the painting. I used tones of blue, turquoise, white and green.

Fruit Bowl

‘Bowl of Fruit’ is a bright and colorful image painted in a modern contemporary style – orange, yellow, purple and black. 

Painted in the impressionist style, I was inspired to paint this piece after seeing the work of Gilles Gorriti whilst in Paris on holidays.

Gorriti is a virtuoso in using the full range of his palette. He creates both subtle, unobtrusive fragments of delicate tones alongside vibrantly orchestrated blocks of color.

I certainly cannot reach his level of skill, I can only hope to one day improve to get somewhere near his level of expertise; but it was fun trying.

Last 2 Methods in the series 24 Ways to make Art

writingWriting:  the art of telling stories only with words

Writing is a medium of human communication that represents language through the inscription or recording of signs and symbols. In most languages, writing is a complement to speech or spoken language. Writing is not a language but a form of technology. Within a language system, writing relies on many of the same structures as speech, such as vocabulary, grammar and semantics, with the added dependency of a system of signs or symbols, usually in the form of a formal alphabet. The result of writing is generally called text, and the recipient of text is called a reader. Motivations for writing include publication, storytelling, correspondence and diary. Writing has been instrumental in keeping history, dissemination of knowledge through the media and the formation of legal systems.

As human societies emerged, the development of writing was driven by pragmatic exigencies such as exchanging information, maintaining financial accounts, codifying laws and recording history. Around the 4th millennium BCE, the complexity of trade and administration in Mesopotamia outgrew human memory, and writing became a more dependable method of recording and presenting transactions in a permanent form. In both Ancient Egypt and Mesoamerica writing may have evolved through calendrics and a political necessity for recording historical and environmental events.

jewelleryGold-smithery, silver-smithery, and jewellery, the art of creating jewels:

Jewellery or jewelry consists of small decorative items worn for personal adornment, such as brooches, rings, necklaces, earrings, and bracelets. Jewellery may be attached to the body or the clothes, and the term is restricted to durable ornaments, excluding flowers for example. For many centuries metal, often combined with gemstones, has been the normal material for jewellery, but other materials such as shells and other plant materials may be used. It is one of the oldest type of archaeological artefact – with 100,000-year-old beads made from Nassarius shells thought to be the oldest known jewellery. The basic forms of jewellery vary between cultures but are often extremely long-lived; in European cultures the most common forms of jewellery listed above have persisted since ancient times, while other forms such as adornments for the nose or ankle, important in other cultures, are much less common. Historically, the most widespread influence on jewellery in terms of design and style have come from Asia.

Jewellery may be made from a wide range of materials. Gemstones and similar materials such as amber and coral, precious metals, beads, and shells have been widely used, and enamel has often been important. In most cultures jewellery can be understood as a status symbol, for its material properties, its patterns, or for meaningful symbols. Jewellery has been made to adorn nearly every body part, from hairpins to toe rings, and even genital jewellery. The patterns of wearing jewellery between the sexes, and by children and older people can vary greatly between cultures, but adult women have been the most consistent wearers of jewellery; in modern European culture the amount worn by adult males is relatively low compared with other cultures and other periods in European culture.

The word jewellery itself is derived from the word jewel, which was anglicized from the Old French “jouel”, and beyond that, to the Latin word “jocale”, meaning plaything. In British English, New Zealand English, Hiberno-English, Australian English, and South African English it is spelled jewellery, while the spelling is jewelry in American English. Both are used in Canadian English.

In formation sourced from Wikipedia.