Three new residents at the Fudge Shop

Today I took three of my little driftwood pieces to stay at the Fudge Shop up on Springbrook Mountain.

Hopefully they will soon find a new home.

azure kingfisherAzure Kingfisher

Scientific name: Ceyx azureus

Alcedinidae

With its combination of royal-blue plumage on its upperparts contrasting with orange on its underparts, the Azure Kingfisher is one of the smallest and most dazzling kingfishers in Australia. This diminutive species inhabits the vegetation beside waterways and other wetlands, where it often perches on low, overhanging branches, searching for its prey of fish, crustaceans and aquatic insects, captured by shallow plunging into the water. Anglers on lonely rivers are sometimes surprised to find an Azure Kingfisher perched quietly on their fishing rods instead of a branch.

 

 

 

ringtail possum 1Eastern Pygmy-possum

Scientific name: Cercartetus nanus

Conservation status in NSW: Vulnerable

Eastern Pygmy-possums are tiny (15 to 43 grams) active climbers, with almost bare, prehensile (capable of curling and gripping) tails, and big, forward-pointing ears.

The Eastern Pygmy-possum is found in south-eastern Australia, from southern Queensland to eastern South Australia and in Tasmania. In NSW it extents from the coast inland as far as the Pilliga, Dubbo, Parkes and Wagga Wagga on the western slopes.

Feeds largely on nectar and pollen collected from banksias, eucalypts and bottlebrushes; an important pollinator of heathland plants such as banksias; soft fruits are eaten when flowers are unavailable.

 

treefrog 2aRed-eye Tree Frog

Scientific name: Litoria chloris,

Also commonly known as the red-eyed tree frog or orange-eyed tree frog, is a species of tree frog native to eastern Australia; ranging from north of Sydney to Proserpine in mid-northern Queensland.

This species of frog is associated with rainforests, wet sclerophyll forests, and woodlands. The call is several long, moaning “aaa-rk” sounds, followed by soft trills. Males call and breeding takes place mostly after rain in temporary ponds, roadside ditches, dams, ponds, and creek offshoots where the water is not flowing.

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